HE Haircut challenge!

We’re joining the national 2.6 challenge to help charities who have cancelled events in light of the UK Coronavirus lockdown.

Hospice Ethiopia UK is coordinating a hair cutting (and potentially hair raising…) challenge with 26 brave volunteers allowing their lockdown comrades to cut their hair. We’ve been kind enough to not specify the required haircut, but [spoiler alert] Jamie Mumford, trustee, has agreed to shave his beard for the first time in 35 years!

Please donate generously, as the Coronavirus is likely to hit Ethiopia very hard. We’ll be coming back with photographic evidence and updates as the locks come off on Sunday 26th April!

This is the link to donate:

Donate to HE Haircut Challenge

Annual meeting and presentation

The Hospice Ethiopia annual meeting will be held on Thursday 5th March 6pm at the Priscilla Bacon Centre for Specialist Palliative Care in Norwich.

Please come and hear the amazing support we have had over the last year and the developments and plans for the next 12 months.

Hospice Ethiopia UK’s annual meeting will be followed by refreshments and an illustrated talk by Sue and Marion about their recent visit to Ethiopia in February 2020.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Patient story

K is a 65-year old married man with liver cancer. When the nurse first saw him, he was suffering from severe back pain, anxiety and a debilitating insect-biting type pain in his legs which meant he slept badly. The nurses prescribed pain killers, explained what was happening to him and he is now sleeping much better. He said “I would like you to come and see me again. I know you have many patients to care for and many responsibilities, but I would like to see you as often as possible. When I meet with you, I feel at ease and get relief from my pain & sickness.” Patient

Feedback such as this shows how the care Hospice Ethiopia provides makes such a difference to the lives of their patients. It’s easy to forget how even basic care such as the provision of pain killers, something we take for granted in the UK, is not available to the vast majority of terminal cases in Ethiopia.

patient K.png

Recent fundraising successes

During the build-up to Christmas we’ve had several very successful fundraising events including a talk by Sue & Jamie at Ranworth Church, bag packing at Tesco’s in Aylsham, St Michael’s Christmas Tree festival and Carols in Aldborough Community Centre. These events have raised just under £900 in total. Very many thanks to all those who supported Hospice Ethiopia at these events.


For the second year running Hospice Ethiopia UK was accepted to take part in The Big Give Christmas challenge. We are delighted that we received 42 donations, which with the matching funds and gift aid totalled the fantastic sum of £10,425. This will pay the nurses’ salaries at Hospice Ethiopia for 6 months. We could not have raised such a phenomenal amount without our supporters’ generosity; we are truly grateful.


Following a talk to Holt Rotary club in October, we are very grateful to Maureen Ford for talking to a Rep from Welland who has supplied over 500 colostomy bags for the patients of Hospice Ethiopia who have a stoma. Colostomy bags are not available at all in Ethiopia, so this donation will really transform the lives of patients. Sue will deliver some of these to hospice Ethiopia when she visits in February.

Below is the lovely and festive HE Christmas tree at St Michael’s Church in December:

xmas tree

 

The Big Give 2019

Many of you have generously made donations in the past that have helped provide crucial care for patients. We’re very excited to let you know that Hospice Ethiopia UK has been selected again this year to participate in the Big Give Christmas Challenge 2019, the UK’s largest match funding campaign.

We will be raising money specifically to pay for the nurses’ salaries at Hospice Ethiopia for six months. These nurses provide vital care and symptom control in people’s homes for those dying from cancer and other terminal illnesses. They are often their only point of contact, bringing relief to truly desperate people.

Donations to this project will be matched for 7 days, from 12pm on Tuesday 3rd December. So, every pound donated during that period means two pounds for Hospice Ethiopia.

How do I donate?

If you would like to support our work this year, we highly recommend doing so during the Christmas Challenge when your donation will make even more of a difference to Hospice Ethiopia.

After 12 noon on the 3rd December, please visit our page at the biggive.org and follow the instructions. Please note that donations made via other means will not be matched so it’s really important to go through the ‘big give’ website.

Please note if you visit before this date/time you will be unable to donate. Instructions on how to donate will be added on the 3rd December.

If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us at info@hospiceethiopia.org.uk

Many thanks in advance for your support.

TBG Logo Horisonal Black Challenge@2x

Meeting Ephrem in Norwich

Blog post written by Revd Canon Nick Garrard, one of the HE Trustees

(as published in the Yarmouth Mercury)

Recently I had a fascinating lunch at Norwich Cathedral. The jacket potato was good but the company made it really special. The special guest was Ephrem Abathun, Director of Hospice Ethiopia

Ethiopia has a population of 100 million people, but only one hospice. Hospice Ethiopia operates out of a rented office in the capital, Addis Ababa. It has no inpatient unit (there are no hospice beds anywhere in Ethiopia), but a trained, dedicated team of nurses and a volunteer doctor take palliative care to patients in their homes. They also provide small grants for food for patients and their families who cannot support themselves. A couple of years ago, Norwich Diocese sponsored a second car, which enabled Hospice Ethiopia to double its caseload. They also train medical staff in pain relief, aiming to make the country’s hospitals ‘pain-free’.

Ephrem came on a whirlwind tour of England to learn more about our care methods and to talk about his hospice’s work. I was struck by Ephrem’s warmth, passion, and eagerness to learn. He was particularly interested in how we provide spiritual care for terminally ill patients, especially through the work of chaplains like my wife Helen, who is chaplain at Priscilla Bacon Lodge. Ethiopia is one of the world’s poorest countries but also the most religious. Two thirds Christian and one third Muslim: 99% of its people said that faith was important to them, compared with only 30% in the UK. Engaging with patients’ faith would help them make their spiritual journey to the end of this life and beyond. Ephrem wants the support that dying people and their families receive to be spiritual as well as physical and psychological.

Ephrem’s vision is to create a centre of excellence in Addis Ababa, where medical professionals can see palliative patient care in practice, to learn new techniques of symptom control and pain relief, and above all, to meet the needs of the ‘whole’ person. In a country where hard-pressed medical services concentrate on treating curable diseases, Ephrem’s hospice is a small voice crying out. But big things come from small beginnings, and change can come quickly. I told Ephrem about my great-grandmother. In the 1900s, she helped my great-grandfather run a pub in a poor area in Norwich. Without any training, she nursed cancer patients and performed operations next to the kitchen fire. Their pub was in sight of the hospital, but no one could afford its services. So much has changed here since. So much can change in Ethiopia too. As Christians we hope for things as yet unseen and, as St Paul tells us, hope does not disappoint us.